Category Archives: Graphics for Change

World Environment Day 2021: Reimagine, Recreate, Restore

“We are a fraction of a second in earth’s lifetime. Yet she is our only lifeline.” — Jordan Sanchez

Since 1974, World Environment Day (WED) has been celebrated every year on June 5, engaging governments, businesses and citizens in an effort to address pressing environmental issues.

WED offers a global platform for inspiring positive change. It pushes for individuals to think about the way they consume; for businesses to develop greener models; for farmers and manufacturers to produce more sustainably; for governments to invest in repairing the environment; for educators to inspire students to take action; and for youth to build a greener future.

WED 2021 is hosted by Pakistan with the theme of “Ecosystem Restoration” under the campaign “Reimagine. Recreate. Restore.” The official hashtags for the Day are #GenerationRestoration and #WorldEnvironmentDay. This year, the Day will also serve as the formal launch of the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (UN Decade) 2021-2030.

Led by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the UN Decade is a rallying call for the protection and revival of ecosystems all around the world. It’s goal is to build a strong, broad-based global movement to ramp up restoration and put the world on track for a sustainable future, which includes building political momentum for restoration and supporting many thousands of on-the-ground initiatives. As a priority, the UN Decade seeks to build the capacity of marginalized groups that stand to lose most from the continued destruction of ecosystems—such as indigenous peoples, women and youth—to take an active role in restoration. Scores of partner organizations have already come forward in support of the UN Decade.

Thousands from around the world are organizing virtual and physical events, small and large to celebrate WED. Browse through the 2021 official schedule of events hosted by UNEP and Decade Partners, featuring high level speakers, expert panels and other events. Get involved with global virtual gatherings, community clean ups, live social discussions, musical and film screenings, and other opportunities for action.


The United Nations Environment Programme asked Jordan Sanchez, who is studying physics at Harvard University, to produce a poem to mark World Environment Day 2021. The result — a spoken word piece titled “Recreate. Reimagine. Restore!” — is a powerful call to action, reminding listeners that we must stop plundering and start protecting the planet’s resources. It ties into the Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, a UN initiative to prevent, halt, and reverse the degradation of ecosystems worldwide.


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International Women’s Day 2021: #ChooseToChallenge

Image from our Girl Power 2021 wall calendar featuring illustrations by Kelly Angelovic.

International Women’s Day on March 8 is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating women’s equality.

International Women’s Day (IWD) has occurred for well over a century, with the first IWD gathering in 1911 supported by over a million people. Today, IWD belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. IWD is not country, group or organization specific.

The theme for 2021 is #ChooseToChallenge. Here’s an excerpt from the IWD website:

A challenged world is an alert world. Individually, we’re all responsible for our own thoughts and actions – all day, every day.

We can all choose to challenge and call out gender bias and inequality. We can all choose to seek out and celebrate women’s achievements. Collectively, we can all help create an inclusive world.

From challenge comes change, so let’s all choose to challenge.

Visit the IWD to read about more ways to celebrate.


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Women’s History Month: International Women’s Day 2020

Image from our Women Who Rock 2020 wall calendar featuring artwork by Rachel Grant. Click for more info.

Women’s History Month 2020: Valiant Women of the Vote

Each year, the month of March is designated by presidential proclamation as a time to recognize and honor women’s contributions to American history.

Women’s History Month began as a local celebration in Santa Rosa, California. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County California Commission on the Status of Women planned and executed a Women’s History Week celebration in 1978. The organizers selected the week of March 8 to correspond with International Women’s Day. The movement spread across the country as other communities initiated their own Women’s History Week celebrations the following year.

In 1980, a consortium of women’s groups and historians—led by the National Women’s History Project (now the National Women’s History Alliance)—successfully lobbied for national recognition. In February 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued the first Presidential proclamation declaring the week of March 8th 1980 as National Women’s History Week.

Subsequent presidents continued to proclaim a National Women’s History Week in March until 1987 when Congress passed Public Law 100-9, designating March as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the president to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, each president has issued an annual proclamations designating the month of March as Women’s History Month.

The National Women’s History Alliance selects and publishes a yearly theme. The 2020 Women’s History Month theme is “Valiant Women of the Vote,” which honors “the brave women who fought to win suffrage rights for women, and for the women who continue to fight for the voting rights of others.”

Visit the National Women’s History Museum website to learn more.

International Women’s Day 2020: #EachforEqual

International Women’s Day on March 8 is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating women’s equality.

International Women’s Day (IWD) has occurred for well over a century, with the first IWD gathering in 1911 supported by over a million people. Today, IWD belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. IWD is not country, group or organization specific.

The theme for 2020 is #EachforEqual. An equal world is an enabled world. Individually, we’re all responsible for our own thoughts and actions—all day, every day. We can actively choose to challenge stereotypes, fight bias, broaden perceptions, improve situations, and celebrate women’s achievements. Collectively, each one of us can help create a gender-equal world.

Visit the IWD website to learn more.

Women Who Rock Our World 2020 Wall Calendar

It’s no secret that, throughout time, societies have emphasized men’s roles and rights. Laws were written by men, for men; education was developed with men in mind; and women were denied equal rights in nearly every aspect. But over the centuries, more and more women have stood up to say, “This isn’t right.” To those women, we raise a fist in reverence and gratitude. They have shown us how to change the world.

Each month of the Women Who Rock 2020 wall calendar highlights one revolutionary woman’s inspirational words paired with dynamic original art by Rachel Grant and a short biography. All of the women in this calendar faced obstacles. Ruth Bader Ginsburg was told she couldn’t be both a lawyer and a mother. Angela Davis was placed on the FBI’s Most Wanted list. Dolores Huerta was assaulted by police while protesting the conditions of farmworkers. Marie Curie’s passion for scientific knowledge eventually killed her. These women were not necessarily liked in their time. But instead of listening to the criticism, they focused on the voices of the people they were inspiring and, in many cases, saving. They stayed true to their values, acknowledged the risks they faced, and raised their voices even louder. We have so much to thank them for, from June Jordan’s powerful words of encouragement to Elizabeth Warren’s extraordinary persistence in making her voice heard.


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May Day – Something for Everyone to celebrate!

2015 Posters for Peace and Justice wall calendar

Published in the 2015 Posters for Peace and Justice wall calendar.
In 2012 dozens of groups around the country decided to change that. They coordinated a general strike to take place on May Day that year, encouraging people to avoid school and work and to take part in Occupy-inspired protests against economic inequality.
Hugh D’Andrade contributed to the movement with this poster, inspired by a nineteenth-century May Day broadside by Walter Crane. He released the poster online, under a Creative Commons license, and encouraged people to download it and use it as they saw fit. Its reach spread far and wide on blogs, news sites, and community boards.

May 1st, often called May Day, just might have more holidays than any other day of the year. It’s a celebration of Spring. It’s a day of political protests. It’s a neopagan festival, a saint’s feast day, and a day for organized labor. In many countries, it is a national holiday. Continue reading

Graphics for Change

Graphics for Change.

This is one of our featured images in the 2011 Posters for Peace and Justice wall calendar. We now have it in a greeting Card also.

We are proud to continue to champion the Poster designers and their messages in our 2013 Calendar, including a number of worthy political and environmental concepts.

Graphics for Change

Some of the poster designers we are featuring in the 2013 Calendar are Luba Lukova, Micah Ian Wright, Dan McCall, Chaz Maviyane-Davies, Max Temkin and Lalo Alcaraz.